Tag Archives: request queue

Linux Device Driver Development: Block Device Driver

It is my very first interaction with Linux kernel at device driver level. My objective is to develop a block device driver, very simple, that just forward I/O requests to a virtual device. This post explains my observations limited to attacking the problem.

Block v/s Character Device

Linux support block and character device drivers. Only block devices can host and support a filesystem. Block devices support random read/write operations. Each block is composed of sectors, usually 512 bytes long and uniquely addressable. Block is a logical entity. Filesystems usually use 4096 bytes blocks (8*512) or 8 sectors. In Linux kernel, a block device is represented as a logical entity (actually just a C structure). So, we can export anything as a device as long as we can facilitate read/writes operations on sector level.

Device driver is the layer that glues Linux kernel and the device. Kernel receives device targeted I/O requests from an application. All I/O requests pass through buffer cache and I/O scheduler. The latter arranges I/O requests optimally to improve seek time, assuming requests would run on a disk. In fact, Linux kernel has various I/O schedulers and hence multiple type of I/O request order could exist.

A device driver always implement a request queue. The Linux I/O scheduler enqueues requests in driver’s queue. How to serve these requests? That is device driver’s headache. The request queue is represented by the request_queue structure and is defined in “blkdev.h". Driver dequeues requests from this queue and send them to device. It then acknowledgement to each requests with error status.

If a device do not need optimal I/O order, it may opt for direct handing of I/O requests. An excellent example of such driver is loopback driver (loop.c, loop,h). It handles struct bio that stands for block I/O. A bio structure is a scatter gather list of page aligned buffer (usually 4K). Handling of bio structure is almost same as a struct req.

What are requirements for my driver

 

  • Runs on flash storage drives
  • Perform plain I/O forwarding
  • Minimal overhead, minimal code size

In my next post, I will discuss design of my driver.

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Hard drives: Native Command Ordering

A simple hard drive today is capable of things that sound like some outlandish technology. Just try to do some file I/O in your application and do it with many threads.

Say you have 4 threads, A,B,C, and D. And request to do I/O comes in A then B and so on. If you check the return status of these threads, the ordering might be surprising. Thread D may return before A. How?

Disk have a technology called Native Command Ordering. So they take your request in and process them on a single, simple logic:

Serve the one which you can do fastest.

This depends on the head position of the disk. The request that can be served with minimal movement of head, is served first.