Android OS: Google DVM and Virtual machines

Published in LinuxForYou, Jun 2011

Abstract

With the outburst of heterogeneous systems, the need for a scalable software system is very much required without compromising the cost of development and maintenance of the software. Virtual machine (VM) provides abstraction from the heterogeneity and presents a low cost and scalable software development environment. VM based modern programming languages like Java is the speaking example of this.

 In this article, we will try to understand the fundamental concepts of a VM by taking the example of Dalvik VM – one of the critical components of Google’s Android Operating System software stack.

The complete article is available here

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The best virtualization software: VirtualBox v/s VMPlayer

I was an avid user of VirtualBox and was pretty happy with it. It gave me freedom to experiment with different OS in a rather safe, transparent, and convenient way. So I used to keep Linux as host and Windows as guest. Performance was good and bugs were non-existent.

Then I found VMPlayer. It surprised me a lot with following reasons:

a) It supported ISO images for Ubuntu, my fav Linux disto.

b) Set up was easier/comparable to VirtualBox.

c) Unity mode: What a feature! A seamless integration of guest OS with host application. You don’t have to click the mouse, you never lose window focus. I can now browse through guest OS with Alt+Tab.

d) Very stable, good performance, and I am a happy customer.

e) The biggest benefit with VMPlayer is seamless file operations between host and guest. You can copy, move, delete files without any problem. VirtualBox still don’t have this feature (till Version 4+, May 2012).

f) Clipboard on VirtualBox is buggy and most of the times non-functional. VMPlayer has a reliable clipboard and you can freely move data between host and guest.